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October Bloom Day

October 15, 2009

Today’s flowers are dedicated to my Uncle Kenny, who passed away last night.

It’s time for another garden blogger’s bloom day, hosted by May Dreams Gardens. Weather forecasts included a frost and a freeze in the last week. I don’t know how frozen things actually got, but there was frost on the windshield yesterday morning. The garden is retiring for the season. Some flowers are fading, some are falling victim to hungry insects with fewer options, and a few are still doing well. This marigold is still blooming profusely. It has been a top performer this year. It was a volunteer from seed dropped last year, but it is at least ten times the size of the best performing, purchased transplant. I’ll be collecting seeds and spreading them around.

marigold

marigold

I prefer the vibrant coloring in the two colored marigolds, but they didn’t perform well.

marigold

marigold

marigold

marigold

I have three coneflowers that I started from seed, last winter. One gave me four blooms this year. The others were in too much shade and will have to be moved in the spring.

coneflower

coneflower

The nasturtiums have always been scrawny, but seem to be enjoying the cooler fall weather.

nasturtium

nasturtium

The zinnias didn’t get enough sun by the mailbox. They managed a few blooms, but they’ve been pale instead of the vibrant red and orange they should have been. This one has a friend hiding amidst its petals.

zinnia

zinnia

The tree mallow was a late addition. I’m not sure, but it may be a short lived perennial. It is supposed to self seed. We’ll see what happens. It’s had a few blooms here and there, but may need dead heading to do well. The bed is new and I let it go to seed to reproduce. There is one bloom left, not quite open.

tree mallow

tree mallow

I planted morning glories last year and was told that I would never be free of them. They are weeds where my in-laws live. So, I happily spread the seeds around, last fall. I had one volunteer during the summer, but it was too close to the tomatoes and had to be pulled. Another turned up in the new paisley garden, around the mailbox. A seed must have found its way into the compost or soil that was spread there. This is its first bloom.

morning glory

morning glory

I started geraniums from seed last winter, in pots. They are slow to get to a decent size, but I enjoyed their flowers. They are inside for the winter. I repotted the smaller ones, and I’ll try cuttings from the largest. These buds are on the one that was purchased and transplanted into the ground.

geranium

geranium

A friend gave me a packet of seeds from her hyacinth bean. The first batch that I planted were devoured by slugs and earwigs. I replanted, but it was late, maybe mid-July. The vines finally started to take off near the end of summer and began blooming in the last week or so. It’s probably much too late to hope it produces seeds for next year, but I can hope anyway.

hyacinth bean

hyacinth bean

The veggie garden is looking pretty empty. I’ve long since pulled all the squash and cucumber and, this week, the last of the tomatoes. However, the eggplants are still blooming. I had three eggplants from the two plants, two of them not until October. I know they won’t produce anymore and it’s time to pull them, but the last blooms are nice to see.

eggplant

eggplant

The dahlias weren’t spectacular, but they did okay. They seemed to take turns blooming instead of putting on a show. They’d probably do better with more sun. I planted several tubers from the garden center, and a few from seeds I started last winter. I’ll try to over winter the tubers and, perhaps, plant them in nice planters where they will get more sun next year.

dahlia

dahlia

dahlia

dahlia

dahlia

dahlia, from seed

The gourds only produced a couple small fruits, but they are still blooming.

gourd

gourd

There are many small flowers in the back. I don’t know if they’re weeds or wildflowers. The difference may only be in how they are perceived. I don’t know if they are annuals or perennials or if they could be moved into a woodland garden, but it might be interesting to find out.

aster

aster

weed ?

weed ?

weed ?

weed ?

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8 Comments leave one →
  1. October 15, 2009 2:34 pm

    I cant stop looking at marigolds in the first photograph. The flowers are a lot bigger than ours right now. The plants are a little bit shorter. Our marigolds are very lanky with numerous small yellow flowers. ~bangchik

  2. October 15, 2009 2:46 pm

    GORGEOUS! Your dahlias, well *SWOON*

    And sorry to hear about your loss. At least you have the bloom day tour to cheer you up a bit!

    Best
    Katie

  3. October 15, 2009 2:51 pm

    I am sorry to hear about your uncle. My deep condolences to your family.
    The blooms in your garden are all so lovely. Marygolds are among my favorites. Morning glory – I wish they’d become weeds in my garden. I don’t have any luck with them. The dahlia with a spiderweb is very elegant.

  4. October 15, 2009 7:39 pm

    How wonderful to dedicate these flowers to your uncle. They all look beautiful. Last blooms of summer are some of the dearest.

  5. October 16, 2009 1:43 am

    The color of the nasturtium petals is incredible — I don’t think they would much care for my desert garden, but I can still dream! And your photos are fantastic!

  6. October 16, 2009 5:42 pm

    You make that eggplant bloom look like an orchid. A lovely pic indeed. The dahlias spectacular. Do have a great weekend.

  7. October 17, 2009 4:19 am

    Awesome blog!

    I thought about starting my own blog too but I’m just too lazy so, I guess Ill just have to keep checking yours out.
    LOL,

  8. October 18, 2009 10:54 pm

    I am so sorry for your loss.

    I am intrigued by the tree mallow. Does it bloom up the cane/linb? Do the seeds have stickery things on the pods?

    The dahlia with the spiderweb is very elegant. That is a lovely description for it.

    My friend has the morning glories that come up everywhere. She fusses and rips them out, they come back with a vengeance. I plenated mine at the same time, same variety, same seed lot, I think. We bought the seeds at the same time, in the same place. I never got one volunteer. I would not rip them out and call them rude names. I would glory in them! Isn’t that about right that we want what we don’t have?

    I have a lot of the hyacinth bean vine seeds, if you don’t get any from your vines. They make the most incredible dark maroon bean pod, very shiney. The seed pods are as pretty as the flowers, in a different way. I would gladly share them, if you will email your snail mail address. My email is in my profile.

    Great post.~janie

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